Are Jesus Christ and Almighty God Part of a Trinity?—-1 Timothy

Are Jesus Christ and Almighty God Part of a Trinity?—-1 Timothy

It is frequently asserted by Bible teachers that Jesus Christ Is Almighty God. If this is so, then we should find plenty of scriptural evidence to support it. Do we? Since 1 Timothy was written by Bible scholar and teacher Paul to counter false teachers and false teachings, let’s see what it says.
“Paul, an apostle of Christ Jesus by the command of God our Savior and of Christ Jesus our hope” (1:1 NIV). God and Christ are clearly portrayed as two separate and distinct individuals. As if this is not enough, it is further emphasized in verse 2:
“Grace, mercy and peace from God the Father and Christ Jesus our Lord” (1:2 NIV). “Grace, mercy and peace” are said to come from God and Christ, with no mention of the Holy Spirit. This would be surprising if the Trinity were true, but since the Holy Spirit is not a person, this statement makes perfect sense. read more

How We Know That Paul Wrote Hebrews

How We Know That Paul Wrote Hebrews

Most scholars and experts today, and since the 1800’s, do not think that Paul wrote Hebrews. This view stands in contrast to the early Christians, and up to the 1800’s, it was unanimous that Paul wrote it, even though the writer isn’t named in the book itself.
Paul was foretold to be God’s “chosen instrument to proclaim my name to the Gentiles and their kings and to the people of Israel” (Acts 9:15 NIV). So the Letter to the Hebrews falls well within this purview. Also, the complex theology and in-depth knowledge of the various details of the Old Covenant sacrificial arrangement fit Paul very well. His close friendship with Timothy, who prison release is mentioned, and the fact that the letter was written in Italy, also fit well with what we know about Paul and Timothy (13:23,24). read more

Does 2 Timothy Support the Trinity?

Does 2 Timothy Support the Trinity?

In Paul’s final canonical letter, and now facing certain execution at the hands of the Romans, we would expect Paul to at least make some mention of the Trinity if it was true, since it is purportedly the primary doctrine of Christianity.
“Paul, an apostle of Christ Jesus by the will of God, in keeping with the promises life that is in Christ Jesus” (2 Timothy 1:1 NIV). There is no mention of the Holy Spirit here, and God, not Jesus, obviously calls the shots since Paul is “an apostle of Christ Jesus by the will of God”. So much for any supposed equality.
“Grace, mercy and peace from God the Father and Christ Jesus our Lord” (2 Timothy 1:2 NIV). In this verse, we again do not find any reference to any Trinity, but we do have “God the Father and Christ Jesus” named as separate and distinct individuals. This idea itself contradicts the Trinity.
“Guard the good deposit that was entrusted to you—guard it with the help of the Holy Spirit who lives in us” (2 Timothy 1:14 NIV). “The Holy Spirit” is referenced by the definite article “the”, and no name is ever given to “the Holy Spirit”, both of which are evidences that the Holy Spirit is not a person.
“Remember Jesus Christ, raised from the dead” (2 Timothy 2:8 NIV). Since “God . . . will never die” (Habakkuk 1:12 NIV), but Jesus did, Jesus cannot be Almighty God. “God has resurrected this Jesus” (Acts 2:32 HCSB), which is strong evidence that God the Father is superior to Jesus.
“In the presence of God and of Christ Jesus, who will judge the living and the dead” (2 Timothy 4:1 NIV). Here we again see a clear distinction between Almighty God and Jesus Christ. This verse also reminds us that “the Father judges no one, but has committed all judgment to the Son” (John 5:22 NIV), which is powerful evidence of the Father’s superiority over the Son. Also notable by absence is any reference to the Holy Spirit. So much for the Trinity, which is never mentioned, either in 2 Timothy, or anywhere else in the Bible.
The Letter of 2 Timothy gives us very good evidence that the Trinity doctrine is not only false, but is one of the “myths” that Christ were foretold to “turn aside to” (2 Timothy 4:4 NIV). read more

Jehovah’s Witnesses—“The Last of the Last Days”

Jehovah’s Witnesses—“The Last of the Last Days”

“Sin is not ended by multiplying words” (Proverbs 10:19 NIV)

“At the beginning their words are folly; at the end they are wicked madness—and fools multiply words” (Ecclesiastes 10:13,14 NIV)

Back in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s Jehovah’s Witnesses were predicting that the year 1914 would be the end of the world, in direct contradiction to Jesus warning that no one knows the date of the end of the world (Matthew 24;36). Rather than repent of their false prophesy (Deuteronomy 18:20-22), after their prediction failed, they began to claim that they had actually accurately foretold some things about 1914, since the first World War started that year. Twenty-nine years later, in 1943, they began to assert that: (1) Jesus had invisibly “returned” by assuming full power as the king of God’s kingdom, and (2) that the “last days” of this world also started in 1914, and (3) “the great tribulation” (Matthew 24:21,22) began, and (4) the generation that was alive in 1914 will not completely die off until the end comes (Matthew 24:34). Jehovah’s Witnesses have held to the first two of these four claims, but have changed the 3rd and 4th claims. read more

DOES THE LETTER OF JAMES SUPPORT THE TRINITY?

DOES THE LETTER OF JAMES SUPPORT THE TRINITY?

James’ short letter to early Christians doesn’t have a plethora of references to God and Jesus, but what it does have is more than enough to demolish Trinitarian notions. First of all, notice who James says that he is a servant of:

“James, a servant of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ” (James 1:1 NIV). James identifies himself as serving two distinct personages, namely Almighty God and Jesus Christ. These two are not merged together, as Trinitarians assert. Notable by absence are references to the Trinity and the Holy Spirit. If these are real, why isn’t James serving them?—The Trinity, of course, is fictional, that’s why James isn’t serving the Trinity. He’s not serving the Holy Spirit because it’s not a person, even though it is real. read more

Colossians—Is Jesus Christ Almighty God?

Colossians—Is Jesus Christ Almighty God?

Let’s examine all the verses in this Bible book where God and Jesus are mentioned in relation to each other and see whether what Bible says agrees with Trinitarianism or proves it to be false. Notice all the references in this letter to the superior position of Almighty God toward his Son, Jesus Christ, and the subordinate position of Jesus Christ in relation to his Heavenly Father.

“An apostle of Jesus Christ by the will of God” (1:1 NIV). Christ is clearly subordinate to God.

“To the holy ones and faithful brothers in Christ in Colossae: grace to you and peace from God our Father” (1:2 NAB). Notice the relationship that Christians have—they are brothers of Christ, but children of God. This clearly places Almighty God in a superior, higher position in relation Jesus Christ. read more

2 Peter—Is Jesus Christ Almighty God?

2 Peter—Is Jesus Christ Almighty God?

Trinitarian bias influences translators to render the first verse of this letter in a way that makes it appear as though Jesus is Almighty God. However, the verse is more accurately translated as:
“Simon Peter, a bondservant and apostle of Jesus Christ: To those to whom there has been allotted the same precious faith as that which is ours through the righteousness of our God and of our Savior Jesus Christ” (2 Peter 1:1 Weymouth).
“Through the righteousness of our God and the savior Jesus Christ” (2 Peter 1:1 NAB ftn).
“Through the righteousness of our God and the Savior Jesus Christ” (2 Peter 1:1 NRSV ftn).
Almighty God and Jesus Christ are thus clearly presented as distinct and separate in these three accurate translations. Notice how this so in the next verse:

“Grace and peace be yours in abundance through the knowledge of God and of Jesus Christ our Lord” (2 Peter 1:2 NIV).

“We told you about the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ in power . . . He received honor and glory from God the Father . . . saying ‘This is my Son” (2 Peter 1:16,17 NIV). Jesus “received honor and glory from God the Father”, and Jesus is called “my Son” by “God the Father”. You can’t receive something from yourself, and, by definition, “Son” and “Father” cannot be the same person.

In 2 Peter, where God and Jesus are mentioned together, they are clearly separate and distinct, which ‘demolishes’ the Trinity ‘stronghold’ (2 Corinthians 10:4 NIV).

Should Christians Get Baptized For The Dead?

Should Christians Get Baptized For The Dead?

“Otherwise, what will they do who are being baptized for the dead, if the dead do not rise at all? Why then are they baptized for the dead?”—- 1 Corinthians 15:29 NKJV

Based on the scripture above, Mormonism teaches that its members have an obligation to research their genealogy and get baptized for any of their deceased relatives who were never baptized in the Mormon Church. The problem with this multifold, primarily:

(1) The scripture is not translated accurately. It should be translated as: “However, people are baptized because the dead will come back to life. What will they do? If the dead can’t come back to life, why do people get baptized as if they can come back to life” (1 Corinthians 15:29 GWT). This verse makes the point that getting baptized makes no sense if there is no resurrection. read more

Should Christians Pay Attention to Genealogies?

Should Christians Pay Attention to Genealogies?

The genealogies leading to the Messiah, Jesus Christ, are vitally important as supportive proofs of his being qualified as God’s Messiah (Matthew 1:1-16; Luke 3:23-38). So we definitely do need them, and should pay attention to them. Other Biblical genealogies, while being important for historical purposes, so we should be aware of them, but, nevertheless, are not of great importance for Christians. Please see the other two articles on this site about genealogies.
Beyond what is mentioned above, Christians are warned:

“Stop teaching false doctrine and occupying themselves with myths and endless genealogies. These myths and genealogies raise a lot of questions rather than focusing on God’s plan, which centers in faith” (1 Timothy 1:3,4 GWT).

“Avoid foolish controversies and genealogies and arguments and quarrels about the law, because these are unprofitable and useless” (Titus 3:9 NIV)

Apparently some first century Christians were indulging in unscriptural “controversial speculations” (NIV) that included “endless genealogies” (NIV), and “arguments and quarrels”. So Christians today can take this as a warning against doing the same things. This doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t study study, discuss and examine different interpretations of the scriptures. The warning is actually against “genealogies”, petty quarrels and “speculations” that “go beyond what is written in Scripture” (1 Corinthians 4:6 GWT). We should engage in honest discussions of the Bible that lead to wisdom (Acts 17:11; Proverbs 17:17).

DO THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE HEBREW AND GREEK OF GENESIS 5 & 11 REALLY MATTER?

DO THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE HEBREW AND GREEK OF GENESIS 5 & 11 REALLY MATTER?

The Bibles that we use today are based on a Hebrew Refined Master Text, usually the Biblica Hebraica. A comparison of the genealogies in Genesis 5:1-32 and 11:10-26 of what is in our Bibles, which translated from the Hebrew, with the Greek Septuagint version, reveals that the Greek version has more years between the time of Adam’s creation and Abraham, because (1) The man’s age when his child is born is longer, usually by 100 years, and (2) Cainan is included in the Greek, but not in the Hebrew.

The following three articles by Henry B. Smith, which are available on the internet, clearly document the case for using the Septuagint genealogies in Genesis 5 and 11, in preference to the standard Hebrew text that all of our Bible translations have:

(1) MT, SP, or LXX? Deciphering a Chronological and Textual conundrum in Genesis 5

(2) Methuselah’s Begetting Age in Genesis 5:25 and the Primeval chronology of the Septuagint: A Closer Look at the Textual and Historical Evidence

(3) From Adam to Abraham: An Update on the Genesis 5 and 11 Research Project: Dec 16, 2017

The fact that Luke’s genealogy includes “Cainan” (Luke 3:36), gives much credence to the case that the Septuagint genealogies in Genesis 5 and 11 are more accurate than the Hebrew text’s. This has the net effect of adding at least 1,250 years to the time from Adam’s creation to Abraham. Expressed slightly differently, it would mean that Adam was created at least 1,250 years earlier, meaning that humans have been on earth for at least 7,250 years.

However, as strong as the case may be for the Septuagint’s genealogies, it is wise not to be dogmatic. Why? The very fact that the inclusion of “Cainan” in Luke 3:36 differs from the standard Hebrew text of Genesis 11, should also give us pause. If God allowed his Word, the Bible to have such a difference indicates that using genealogies to create a chronological timetable, or timeline, may not be what God wants us to do! This is one area where there is enough doubt as to which genealogical table is correct, the Hebrew or the Greek, that we can conclude it is not really important.

See the upcoming article: Are Genealogies Important for Christians?

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